12 October 2012

A Handful of Seed

can become a forest! 




7 Months after re-potting



End of first Summer 



Guardian of the forest


Choose the seed of a tree that has the desirable attributes of a good bonsai-- small leaves, proportionate flowers and a woody trunk. The planting of a 'forest' begins with a scattering of seed in a long nursery tray. The seedlings were allowed to grow tall to help develop the trunks. Then the trees are cut short! Any trees that do not fit into the arrangement are culled. Then manage the forest. The creation of a bonsai from a seed is very rewarding.




Japanese Maple seedlings
allowed to grow tall for
two seasons to develop
the trunks.



Japanese Maple







Then the trees are shortened

















 Any trees that do not fit into
the arrangement are culled.



















  Manage the forest as the years go by
The creation of a bonsai from a seed is very rewarding.



Tsukamiyose:
A way to plant several to several dozen seedlings by lump in a pot. Since the roots of seedlings are planted with all of them attached to one another, they come closer together and develop into multiple trunks having an interesting flavor to them.

Misho:
Bonsai tree grown from seed. It refers to planting seeds and cultivating them. This way of cultivation does not require great care and is suitable for beginners. The method is advantageous in that a tree can be grown as a bonsai plant from the start and that its ''nebari'' surface roots develop sufficiently. However, it takes a great deal of time to grow a tree into a finished one, and the method may cause a transubstantiation phenomenon that makes a tree species unstable, disadvantageous points for the ''misho'' cultivation method. The method is applicable for most tree species. Among ''shohaku'' evergreen pines, it is often used for ''goyomatsu'' (Japanese White Pine) and ''kuromatsu'' (Japanese Black Pine) trees. ''Momiji'' (Japanese Maple), ''keyaki'' (Japanese Zelkova), ''kaede'' (Maple) and ''soro'' (Japanese Zelkova) are among ''zoki'' deciduous trees to which the ''misho'' cultivation method is applied.

Hataagemono

The term refers to a bonsai tree that is transplanted into a pot after being grown in the field. Such trees grow in a short period of time and are traded at relatively low prices despite their large size. They are easily obtainable and popular. But it cannot be denied that such trees look less gorgeous than products grown in containers for a long time. What is important is to completely wipe off field soil from the tree before putting it into a pot.



Many poke fun at the idea of starting a bonsai from a seed. “Look how old I am. I don't have time". If not now, when?





LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails